Serving Up Love with Ginger Lemon Tea

When talking with Ayurvedic doctors in New Delhi, India, there are many daily practices that are encouraged based on each individual’s particular body make-up. Ayurveda, one of the oldest medicinal systems, is based on the notion of doshas, that each person has a certain combination of elements that influence the body: the types of food to be eaten, the best times of day for work or for rest, the forms of exercise that benefit the body most. For those who have often struggled with digestive problems, be it a slow constitution or frequent stomach cramping and aches, one remedy prescribed is a morning brew of ginger and lemon tea.

The word tea doesn’t really even apply to this simple tincture, a combination of boiled water, lemon, and sliced and peeled ginger. It is a daily tonic that not only warms the intestinal system, but also can spark digestion for the day ahead. As women age, the body too find new methods of processing, of slowing down. A slow digestive system is one of the problems many women report. A survey in 2013 showed that almost 75% of Americans struggle with digestive problems symptoms. The factors are multifold, and require a longer commitment to a healthier lifestyle, including elements of exercise, cooking, intentional grocery shopping, and other environmental and mental factors. But one solution to jumpstarting a slow digestive system is a simple brew of ginger and lemon tea.

natural anti aging secrets - ginger lemon tea benefits

Ginger Lemon Tea benefits – Juveriente ®

Preparing Lemon Ginger Tea

Boil 2-4 cups of water.

Peel a portion of the ginger root about the size of half a finger’s length.

Slice the ginger into small pieces.

When the water is boiling, add the ginger and steep for 5-10 minutes in a covered pot.

Drain the ginger water into a mug and squeeze half a lemon into the mug.

Stir and drink, slowly, with intention.

You will see that in a week you already getting positive lemon ginger tea benefits.

The Benefits of Ginger and Lemon

 Benefits of Ginger and Lemon

Ginger, a rhizome of the zingiber family, is packed with antioxidants that combat the attack of free radicals on the body, uncharged molecules that can cause oxidative stress and undermine the body’s strength. Ginger is also anti-inflammatory, antifungal, anti-parasitic, and antimicrobial.Think of it as a broom sweeping through and scrubbing at the intestinal lining, searching for and eliminating signs of oxidative stress and bacterial build-up. When the ginger can help the body better absorb nutrients, the fresh lemon juice targets indigestion and heartburn. Both lemon and ginger also contain large quantities of vitamins A and C, which can help improve hair quality as well as dry skin. Most impressively, however, is that this concoction, while helpful for digestion, also targets cognitive function.

Good for the Body and Mind

Lemon, being high in potassium, stimulates the nervous system in the brain, providing an extra jolt of mental energy. Ginger, simultaneously, improves blood function, increasing the body’s circulation and carrying important vitamins, minerals and nutrients to the body’s cells.

The Power of New Habits

A simple glass of this warming liquid in the morning can help jump start the day in a way that is both energizing and calming. The stomach is activated, ready to consume the healthy foods that will follow, and the mind is alert, prepared to tackle the tasks of the day. Also, the simple practice of morning ritual is known to have a calming effect on times of transition, which is the best way to describe the cycle of menopause. New habits are a science, a practice of identifying what the body needs and giving it an accompanying reward. They can be created at any age, and any new habit that serves the body’s greater good can be implemented during the menopausal cycle. It is a time when the body asks for more love, more kindness, and more nurturing, and that can be given even in a simple glass of morning tea.

menopause relief and anti aging - Effisoy

Total Anti-Aging Benefits of Effisoy®

The reasons why you should take Effisoy® continuously in the long run

Hello!

Maybe you recognize our Effisoy® only as a natural menopause supplement to mitigate hot flash and night sweats. But, its key ingredient, AglyMax®, has multiple anti-aging benefits by balancing waned hormone precursor (DHEA) naturally.

old lady is depress because of her anti aging treatment

It is not only for unpleasant menopause symptoms improvement, but will also help your healthy life in various aspects. There are many reasons that you take Effisoy® continuously in the long run.

  • Menopause Relief from;
    Hot Flash
    Night Sweats
    Insomnia
    Osteoporosis
    Weight gain, etc.

  • Anti Aging Benefits like;
    Fatigue mitigation
    Recovery of lost muscle by age (= recovery of metabolism) (= weight management)

  • It has high Antioxidant Capacity (the following is from a leaflet by the manufacturer of AglyMax®.)
AglyMax® has multiple anti-aging benefits

We are introducing the health benefits of Miso soup in the Effisoy®’s product page, and Effisoy® will bring you the essence of that traditional Japanese diet. Try it now, and continuously!

An Overview of Japanese Healthy Living

Routinely, Japanese men and women have been ranked as some of the healthiest people on the planet. A study by the World Health Organization found that Japanese women actually have the longest life expectancy at 87 years. Genes certainly play a role, but as more research and studies are directed at understanding health, it has become more and more clear that simple lifestyle changes can have dramatic effects. The Japanese lifestyle, down to what is eaten and when, how much to eat, and the use of food in creative ways, can be replicated in other cultures. Though it may seem difficult to adapt a Japanese method of eating while living in the United States, these small, powerful changes are not only beneficial for the body, but also for the environment and the mind. 

Be Diligent in Your Meals
Japanese Health Foods

In Japan, soup, especially miso soup, is one of the staples. This warming concoction not only helps you to feel fuller more quickly, but it also creates energy in the digestive tract, often making it easier to metabolize and digest other food. Japanese people often eat a seafood and rice-based diet as well, relying on these staples daily to provide healthy nutrients and vitamins. Studies have shown that a seafood rich diet can correlate with a significant decline in risk for heart disease. The omega-3 fatty acids in fish have also been linked to living longer and to preventing certain types of cancer.  Rice, when compared to bread or pasta or potatoes, often isn’t served with as many complementary calories, like butter or sauce, and expands in the stomach to make you feel full. All of these factors create a healthier baseline of diet.

Regarding how you eat, it’s important to monitor portion control. Many Americans eat significantly larger portions than people in other parts of the world. More than 1/3 of Americans are obese, and portion sizes has been studied as one of the leading reasons. In fact, in the last 70 years, the average portion has become 4 times larger than it was, and Americans now have the highest per capita calorie consumption in the world. Overeating is not a natural nor healthy phenomenon. Paying attention to how much you eat, when you eat, and the process of eating can help reduce overeating. 

Hara Hachi Bu (Don’t Overeat) 

This saying comes from Okinawa and serves as a constant reminder—only eat until you’re about 80% full. In the fast-paced lifestyle of many Americans, this practice takes time and diligence to implement. The faster one eats, the harder it is to realize whether or not you’re full. However, if you begin to pay attention to this threshold of 80% and stop when you reach that level, your brain will catch up shortly after your stomach, and you’ll find yourself with more energy after meals. After dining according to the 80% threshold, rather than dealing with possible stomach pain, gastrointestinal aches, or a lack of energy, your body will be ready to convert those calories into energy for whatever is needed next. Food is meant to restore our energy, not deplete it. 

Mottainai (No Waste)
Small Packings of left foods

Thinking creatively about food and how to use every part of the meal is another practice that the Japanese frequently implement. It is called mottainaiand translates into “try not to waste it.” In Japan, people often use left-overs for future meals, saving rice, vegetables, fish, and other condiments to add more flavor to plates. Knowing that you won’t waste food, it makes it easier to eat smaller portion sizes in the moment and save the rest for later. 

Japanese Miso Extract Supplement

Learning from the Japanese and Natto

Japanese Natto Food: Our recent article explored the benefits of fermented food, particularly foods like miso, and soy sauce. A deep-dive into another fermented food, natto, shows that this particular food may have many benefits that help women going through menopause. Natto, not nearly as popular as its “cousin” tofu, has been eaten in Japan for millennia. It is made of fermented soybeans, soybeans which are fermented with the bacteria bacillus subtilus. The beans are first cooked for hours before the bacteria are introduced in a temperature-controlled fermentation room. After a day or so, the beans are cooled and stored in a refrigerator for the flavor to mature.

The beans develop into a slightly sticky texture, though they still look like gooey chickpeas. Some complain that the odor of natto is not the most appetizing, ranging from exercise socks to paint thinner, from ammonia to Camembert cheese, and yet, depending how it’s prepared, the odor does not have to be overly pungent. It is certainly an acquired taste, but with that acquisition come all of the health benefits.

Health Benefits of Natto

The active ingredient in Natto is nattokinase. This enzyme not only helps aid circulation, but it also works to clean out the blood vessels which reduce the risk of hypertension, stroke and heart disease. It is also strong in K2, a vitamin that helps with bone health. The ability to bolster bone strength is one of the reasons why natto should be considered by menopausal and postmenopausal women. One study of Japanese women who were postmenopausal showed that those who consumed natto regularly were less likely to develop bone density loss which helped protect them against osteoporosis. In comparison to other soy products like tofu, there was no correlation between improved bone density and consumption.

Superfood Benefits
A healthy Japanese old woman with his white dog
A healthy Japanese old woman

When looking at the chemical breakdown of natto, it’s easy to see why it’s such a superfood. Natto has no cholesterol, and also contains lots of potassium and dietary fiber, two of the elements responsible for cleaning out the arteries. Because natto is fermented, the bacteria it contains helps to clean out the gut while the enzyme nattokinase cleans out the blood vessels. Vitamins, protein, and iron are all abundant in natto as well, making it not only healthy food to consume, but a good weight loss food that is both filling and nutritious.

Natto Recipe Preparation

When making a dish with natto, there are many methods for preparation. In Japan, it is commonly served with rice and fermented vegetables. This way of serving natto is a traditional breakfast in Japan. Another way to eat natto is to whip it with a fork, making it into a sort of fluffy paste, and then use apple cider vinegar, mustard, and cultured vegetables to add more flavor. It is, as mentioned above, an acquired taste, so finding a way to prepare it that works for you and your loved ones is best. 

As more evidence comes out that much of menopause is influenced by lifestyle, more so than genetics, it’s important to consider healthy diet and exercise choices that can minimize any difficult symptoms of menopause. Natto is one of the foods that can best alleviate negative symptoms while working to ensure healthy flow of systems in the body.

Fermented Soy: A History

When the word ‘fermentation’ comes to mind, one might think of alcohol, of sourdough bread, of pickles. It is a word that conjures up images of bubbliness, or strange scientific processes that can’t always be understood but tend to have healthy outcomes. Fermentation has been a hot topic in American media the last few years as many folks “rediscover” the health benefits of consuming fermented foods. There are festivals and restaurants that specifically fetishize fermentation. However, like many other trends, including that of “discovering” turmeric, the benefits of fermented foods have been around for millennia, and one of the places that best exemplifies those benefits is Japan.

For generations, the Japanese people have utilized the healthy benefits of fermented food to aid in flavor-enhancement and digestion. Two of the most popular soy products, miso and soy sauce, are staples in most meals, including breakfast. To ferment soy properly, or to ferment most foods, a careful balance of skill and practice is necessary. Fermentation can happen with many different types of bacteria. In its most simple definition, fermentation is the harnessing of microorganisms and bacteria in food. 

Since Japan is surrounded by water and enjoys a warm, humid climate throughout most of the year, fermentation began naturally and has been infused into daily practice. Some of the various fermenting agents include types of mold like aspergillus, yeast fungus, lactic acid bacteria, natto bacillus, and other fungi. 

Popular Fermentation

When it comes to two of the most popular condiments in Japanese culture — miso and soy sauce — the role of fermentation cannot be underplayed. Not only does the fermentation add flavor to these condiments and to the meals, but it also aids in digestive processes, amplifies certain flavors, diminishes some of the more intense smells, and regulates the stomach and intestines. Other typical fermented foods and beverages in Japan include mirin, a sweet rice wine, fish sauces, ishiru (a sauce made from entrails and heads of squid) and Shottsuru (made from the liquid of a fermenting fish). Another example is natto, made from fermented soybeans, a health food noted for nattokinase, an enzyme that can destroy blood clots, thin blood, and improve overall circulation. 

Mastering Fermentation 

The process of creating these perfectly balanced fermented foods is inherited through generations. Currently, there are more than 1500 local producers of soy sauce in Japan and more than 1,000 miso makers. When the tsunami and earthquake hit in 2011, many of the businesses and corporations that had their recipes for fermentations — balances and formulas of correct bacteria—were destroyed. Just like the famous sourdough bread of San Francisco that has been made with the same starter for decades, many of the recipes for fermented soy and other products are perfectly balanced formulas that have been carried for generations. As many Americans continue to learn about the benefits of fermented food, there is much we can incorporate from the Japanese culture, as well as others, that have used this method of preserving and cooking for millennia. Our digestive systems will thank us.

EFFISOY - For menopause relief and anti-aging

Healthy Living for the Bones: Exercise

When it comes to having healthy bones as you age, one of the best things you can do is exercise. Like muscles, bones are, quite simply, living tissue. Always changing, always growing, always capable of strengthening. Through food and supplemental choices, one can bolster the body’s ability to fortify bones with calcium, vitamin D and phosphorus, but another important component, especially when combating risk of osteoporosis, is exercise.. 

Simple, specific movements, specifically when working against gravity or using weight as resistance are two of the best ways to improve bone strength. In general, humans reach their peak bone mass in the third decade, and from that span of time, are in a slightly degenerative process that requires more attention and care to support healthy bones. Starting a daily exercise routine, 30 minutes as many days as possible, as recommended by the Surgeon General, is one of the best ways to weave healthy habits into your daily life. 

Anti-Gravity Exercises
exercises - healthy living for strong bones

When working to strengthen aging bones, some of the best exercises require minimal investment. Walking, jogging, and hiking are three ways that your body is working against gravity, and three ways that your bones can strengthen over time. The force that you exert as you lift and lower, move and stretch your legs, is one of the best ways for the body to work within its own limits, to use what is naturally available, in order to become stronger. Similarly, other anti-gravity exercises could be playing tennis, dancing, or climbing stairs. All of these activities, with the exception of tennis, require no financial investment in other objects, like a racquet or a ball. There are dance classes available for all ages, and all stages of dance, in most cities, and dancing on your own, or with the assistance of online videos, is always an option. Finally, climbing stairs, whenever you get the chance, rather than taking the escalator or the elevator, is a direct way you can strengthen your bones. Think about it with each step: my bones are getting stronger. 

Resistance Training
women stretching - healthy living for strong bones

Coupling anti-gravity exercises with resistance exercises is the best combination you could create. Resistance exercisesare essentially strength training and using weights to improve muscles and bones. It essentially uses force to strengthen. Higher weights with shorter repetitions are recommended for younger folks, but as we age, higher weights may not be as feasible for older folks. Newer studies have shown that light weights coupled with a lot of repetitions also work to increase bone density. Noting that osteoporosis most often affects the hips, wrists, and vertebrae in the spine. The hip bones, or pelvis, can be strengthened with leg lifts, squats, lunges (weighted or not), and other types of weighted movement with resistance bands. For wrists, strengthening the ulna and radius, the two bones that are below the elbow, as well as the humerus, can all help the bones in the wrist. Various combinations of bicep and tricep exercises, as well as lateral lifts and even light bench pressing, can help strengthen this part of the body. 

Taking Care of the WholeOverall, while exercise is a vitally important component of bone strength, it should be paired with healthy food and daily supplements to help bones to become as healthy as possible. These exercises can be practiced in small moments of daily life, even at an office or at home, rather than at a gym. Walking, taking the steps, and lifting light weights above the head (even if it’s a book or an object in the office) are ways that you can bring health into everyday practices.

Healthy Living for the Bones: Food and Diet

Did you know that your bones are alive? Every day, our bones are constantly breaking down and building back up. This constant cycle is one of the many ways the body replenishes nutrients, strengthens, and evolves. However, with time, and age, bones tend to break down more than they restrengthen. This breaking down of bones- most often in the wrist, hips, knees, or spine- is known as osteoporosis. There is much to understand about the disease, but more than anything, prevention in the areas of diet and supplements is vitally important for fotralizing the bones and strengthening the body. 

Food for the Bones

Many studies have been done on food that contributes to bone health, but the most important factors come down to calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Vitamin D strengthens bones by helping the body absorb more calcium and phosphorous, two of the elements your body needs more than most. Calcium and phosphorus are the bone builders. Specifically, phosphorus provides structure to the nucleic acids and cell membranes, which contributes to your body’s energy production. Calcium, on the other hand, mostly resides in the bones and teeth. It helps the body communicate better through its nervous system, as well as strengthens the bones to withstand fractures, or breaking. The two together are better absorbed with extra vitamin D. 

Food Choices for Healthy Bones

When creating a diet that provides key nutrients for the body, it’s important to start with calcium. Dairy products, from cheese to milk, are key sources of calcium. Most cheeses, are the best sources of calcium, with parmesan having the most. Softer cheese have slightly less calcium but still contain substantial amounts. Yogurt, ranging from plain to greek to flavored, also contains high amounts of calcium. If, however, you are dairy-free or lactose intolerance, there are many options that do not fall into the dairy realm.

Seeds, specifically poppy, sesame, celery and chia, all contain significant calcium for bone health, as do the fish bones of salmon and sardines. Believe it or not, eating canned salmon and sardines, because of their edible bones, is a great source of calcium. Certain beans, specifically winged beans, are also great sources, as well as the solid snack food– almonds. In the realm of vegetables, dark leafy greens like collard greens, spinach and kale also contain quantities of calcium which can help reinforce bone health. There are plenty of options, and the key is to incorporate these healthy eating habits into your daily life and choices. 

Additional Support for Strong Bones

Complementing food choices is the option of addition supplements, like Bone Supplement. This combination of minerals and vitamins targets the body specifically, helping to strengthen the bone by providing  more vitamin D to better absorb phosphorus and calcium, those two minerals your body craves the most when it comes to bone health. Remember, bones, though they are steady and strong, are not nearly as solid as we think they are. They are constantly regenerating, and the more ways you can bolster them in their regeneration process, the stronger they will be for years to come. 

Address Bone Health and Osteoporosis Naturally with Japanese Bone Health Complex Natural Formula.

Am I My Mother’s Menopause?

Now that we have decoded the human genome, scientists have found that while our genes can increase risk factor for various diseases, environment and lifestyle play a huge role in our health. How we grow up in early childhood can have many down-the-line consequences. Similarly, stressful situations, which increase our cortisol levels, also can manifest markedly in the health of a person. When it comes to menstruation, genetics do play a role, and yet, they are not all-encompassing. 

Early Menopause

If there are no other reasons for early menopause-related to prior diseases, then genetics can be viewed as an indicator as to when you may begin perimenopause. Early menopause can begin in the late-30s. Yet, there are many factors that can influence when a woman may start this transition. Lifestyle factors, like smoking or living at higher altitude, can play a part. Also, as estrogen is stored in the fat tissues, women who have low body mass indices (BMI) may actually begin menopause earlier because their estrogen runs out faster. Turner Syndrome and other chromosomal defects may also lead to early menopause. 

Menopause and Its Story

Some women grow up watching their mothers move through menopause with apprehension. They may remember if their moms had hot flashes, intense irritability and mood swings, and then wonder if they, too, will experience those symptoms. Other women, however, see their mothers during menopause who show no signs or symptoms. Perhaps their mothers deeply enjoy the process, the relief from fear of unwanted pregnancy, and the liberation from a cycle that may have been challenging. As women age, with the knowledge that have about menstruation and menopause from their mothers, family members, friends, and teachers, influences how we approach menopause—with apprehension or with curiosity. 

However, lots of studies have been done to see what the correlation is between a mother’s menopause and her daughter’s and the results are not conclusive. Though there seems to be some similarity regarding time, that onset of menopause, other factors, like lifestyle choices, are found to be more influential. Regarding symptoms, genetics do not seem to be a strong predictor. If your mother had heightened symptoms during menopause, it doesn’t necessarily mean you will as well. 

Rolling with the Waves

When perimenopause and menopause begin, it’s important to do your own investigation into what your body wants and needs. Some studies have shown that thirty minutes of exercise a few times a week can drastically reduce the negative symptoms of menopause. Eliminating those sugar-packed, high-caffeine foods can also help with the symptoms of menopause. These important changes in daily living seem to have much more of an effect than any sort of genetic map of what and when to expect with your own transition into menopause. 

Libido and Menopause, and How to increase Libido after Menopause

Libido and Menopause

What causes sex drive? A romantic date night? Your time in your cycle? The causes for libido are limitless, and as vast as the imagination. Breaking down desire into biology and environmental factors can help isolate certain methods to remedy decreasing sexual desire. As with many changes in life, talking through the shifts is important. This can happen in intentional conversations with a partner, as well as with the assistance of therapists and counselors who may be able to help couples work through barriers. Many women tend to experience a decrease in sex drive between the ages of 35 and 64. This period of time is vast, and yet, changes in libido is not a concrete science or a guarantee. Paying attention to yourself, and your desires, is a great place to start.

Various Therapies to Increase Sex Drive

As with other symptoms of menopause, there are many hormonal and non-hormonal therapies that can be explored. Learning what works for your body, as well as noting any risk factors you may have, is a conversation worth having. Regarding sexual desire, some women explore testosterone-replacement therapy in the form of creams and other medications, though the FDA does not approve this form of hormone therapy for women during menopause. Hormone replacement therapies can lead to a renewal in sexual desire, as can changes in diet and exercise. However, it must be noted that not all women experience a decrease in sex drive during menopause. Some women actually have an increase in libido.

Menopause cycle

When looking at the biological factors of sex drive, they can often be linked to a time in a woman’s menstrual cycle. Right before and after women ovulate, many women have increased libido. However, as menstruation and therefore ovulation cease, there isn’t that extra burst of estrogen which can lead to an increase in libido. The loss of estrogen also contributes to vaginal dryness.

Women are not the only ones who may experience a decline in sex drive. Men can also experience this shift, although women are two to three times more likely to report this change. Another factor, for both women and men, is the decrease of testosterone (which yes, women have as well). Testosterone is the active hormone related to sexual response. However, even with these biological factors at play, simple over-the-counter remedies like water-based lubricants can reignite the flame and make sexual intercourse more enjoyable. Beyond that treatment, having conversations about what’s happening—and reconnecting with your partner—is important.

Emotional Factors

Anxiety and stress, along with everyday life factors—concern about work, family, friends, the community, health, education—all play a role when it comes to sexual desire. The more stressed a person is, the harder it can be to find yourself “in the mood.” Therapists recommend taking time with a partner to do romantic activities, however those might be defined for you. Planning time for yourselves, rather than just hoping it will happen, can help couples come together even in times of difficulty.

It’s Not All Bad—Good Things Around the Corner

While some women certainly experience a drop in sexual desire at some point of menopause, many women also report an increased joy when it comes to sex. No longer is there a concern for pregnancy, and the hormonal shifts of menstruation slowly disappear. The lessening of stress surrounding pregnancy can often be a huge relief for women. Redefining intimacy in these moments is important—what does it mean to you and your partner? Sex therapists recommend exploring new methods of intimacy and being open with your partner. Rather than looking at this time as something to fear, looking at it through the lens of curiosity can open up many possibilities.

Empty Nest Syndrome and Menopause at the Same Time? Fear Not! ®Juveriente’s Blog

Though it is not a clinical disorder, empty nest syndrome is a transition period when parents adapt to what their lives are like without children. Historically, the depression and anxiety that may accompany this transition period tend to affect women more often than men as women have been expected to stay at home and raise children in the “traditional American household.” Nowadays, as the traditional family looks vastly different–single parents, stay at home fathers, same-sex parents, etc.– the difficulty of transitioning through this period effects all types of parents.

What is Empty Nest Syndrome

Psychology Today defines empty nest syndrome by its symptoms: “Grief, depression, a loss of purpose and a sense of sadness may be experienced when children enter their own relationships or when they start their college careers.” Though there is no single remedy for this period, many methods of self care are encouraged. Empty nest syndrome may seem more intense for a woman who is also experiencing the effects of menopause.

diet and nutrition for menopause

Diet and Nutrition

When considering diet, opting for a diet that causes less gastric distress is important. When the body is processing difficult to digest foods, it can be taxing emotionally and mentally. Diets rich in nutrients and minerals, healthy proteins and fermented soy, and minimal in sugar and white carbohydrates is a good starting place. Taking a supplement like Effisoy, based in the science of fermented soy and estrogen regeneration rather than replacement, can also ease the effects of menopause.

Exercise

Women going through menopause may feel a need to slow down their exercise regime, but studies show that women should actually continue exercising as much as they can as they age, incorporating all types of fitness: strength training to improve the muscles, balancing exercises for the joints, stretching for muscles and flexibility, and higher-impact aerobic exercises like running and walking to aid the skeleton. Exercise, along with being important for the body, also helps the mind by improving mood, bettering sleep, and decreasing anxiety.

counselling empty nest syndrome and menopause

Counseling and Mental Care

When experiencing empty nest syndrome, it’s important to take time to question the self as the transition occurs: Where is the sense of life purpose coming from? What parts of this period are easier and more difficult? How much of the sense of self was tied to being a parent, rather than being an individual? Forms of therapy, like psychotherapy and other types of counseling, can be helpful as a woman, as a parent, goes through their own questions of identity. Reconnecting with the self as well as with your partner are vital during this point of shifting. Filling daily life with work, with hobbies, with things that you want to do for yourself, is an opportunity to deepen, rather than an emptiness to fear.

These practices of scanning the self, emotionally, mentally and physically, during times of transition are important for women especially, but for all parents, during the transition of empty nest syndrome.