Blog

Featured

Total Anti-Aging Benefits of Effisoy®

The reasons why you should take Effisoy® continuously in the long run

Hello!

Maybe you recognize our Effisoy® only as a natural menopause supplement to mitigate hot flash and night sweats. But, its key ingredient, AglyMax®, has multiple anti-aging benefits by balancing waned hormone precursor (DHEA) naturally.

old lady is depress because of her anti aging treatment

It is not only for unpleasant menopause symptoms improvement, but will also help your healthy life in various aspects. There are many reasons that you take Effisoy® continuously in the long run.

  • Menopause Relief from;
    Hot Flash
    Night Sweats
    Insomnia
    Osteoporosis
    Weight gain, etc.

  • Anti Aging Benefits like;
    Fatigue mitigation
    Recovery of lost muscle by age (= recovery of metabolism) (= weight management)

  • It has high Antioxidant Capacity (the following is from a leaflet by the manufacturer of AglyMax®.)
AglyMax® has multiple anti-aging benefits

We are introducing the health benefits of Miso soup in the Effisoy®’s product page, and Effisoy® will bring you the essence of that traditional Japanese diet. Try it now, and continuously!

LEARN MORE

Fermented Soybeans / Variations and Health Benefits

Fermented soybeans are staples in Japan, and they account for a significant part of the healthy Japanese diet. Natto, miso, soy sauce. Can we take the same health benefit in the Western world?

Let’s dig into the basics of the fermented foods and fermented soybeans.

The difference between fermentation and rotting

Microorganisms transform foods into different forms. If the new characteristics are useful for humans, it is fermentation. Otherwise, it’s rotting. The border is simply “whether it is useful for human or not.”

It explains why fermented foods have unique, or odd, flavors (or smells.)

According to Dr.Fushiki of Kyoto University, “Umami is global, but the flavor is local.” It means, umami is a good taste for people from any culture, but the flavor preference is something nurtured in each culture. Natto looks and smells weird to non-Japanese people. But it is something to stimulate appetite for most Japanese people, except for some regions.

On the other hand, most of them couldn’t eat cheese and yogurt in the past. Nowadays, western foods are prevalent in contemporary Japan, and they love those western fermented foods. Yes, once the “odd” flavor becomes familiar by habituation, the umami will steal their heart.

Fermentation resolves foods out to lower molecular.

The other description to keep in your mind is that fermentation will resolve foods out to lower molecular. Let’s take a look at isoflavone. Isoflavones in standard isoflavone supplements contain sugar, and it makes the molecular too big. We can’t absorb it before removing it in our guts. But fewer people have an intestinal environment to do it.  Isoflavones from fermented soybeans are small and absorbable enough for anybody. Effisoy® is the only supplement to contain such isoflavone in the USA.

Three microorganisms to cause fermentation.

We have three types of microorganisms that turn foods more healthy and tasty—yeast, mold, and bacteria.
Wine is one of the oldest fermented foods in history. There is a winery in the remain of 6,100 years ago in Mesopotamia. In this ancient (and also contemporary) fermentation, yeast transforms the sugar of grape into alcohol. It is rather simple.

Fermented milk like yogurt and cheese is one of the oldest fermented foods, too. A bacteria called lactobacillus transforms milk into yogurt, and mold turns it into cheese.

These are rather simple fermentations by a single type of microorganism. The human developed more complicated fermentations.

It is common in East Asia to turn starches into sugar by molds called “koji” in Japanese and further transform it into alcohol by yeast. Japanese sake breweries convert the rice starch into sugar by koji mold and simultaneously turn the sugar into alcohol by yeast and lactobacillus. The more complicated process will require more complicated craftsmanship and create a wide variation of the taste and flavor, and rich nutrients.

Why many fermented soybeans in Japan?

Soy Consumption by country
Soy consumption as a food per capita is outstanding in Japan, far above all other countries.

Most Japanese people avoided meat in most of their long history for their religious reason, and it nurtured their unique dietary culture to place soy as one of their primary sources of protein. (Refer “Healthy Japanese Food“)

On the other hand, Japan has also nurtured the rich dietary culture of fermented foods in their humid climate. These two features interacted with each other and created their super healthy food materials, fermented soybeans, as miso, natto, and soy sauce, as their staples.

About Koji Mold: For your better understanding of fermented soybean foods

koji for fermentation
Mixing a koji and soy paste

Japanese fermented soybean foods manufacturers plant molds grouped as “koji mold” on grains like rice, barley, or beans. These molded grains are called “koji” and they start the fermentation process by putting koji.

Koji plays mainly two roles.

(1) Molds on the koji generate enzymes, and the enzymes resolve the protein, fat, or starch of the primary materials and bring alcohol, umami ingredients, flavors, etc.

(2) The koji mold transforms the grain starch into sugar, etc., and it plays a significant role even in the final product’s taste and flavor profile.

Miso, Natto, Soy Sauce: The Differences and health benefits

Miso’s production method

miso brewery
A traditional miso brewery building

They will add koji by rice, barley, or beans into steamed soy with salt. The added salt and the sugar resolved from the grain will kill unnecessary microorganisms. The enzymes from the koji work initially, but koji mold extinguishes under the very salty environment. Then multiple salt-tolerant yeast and lactic acid succeed in the leading roles.

Salt concentration affects the activities of these various microorganisms, fermentation speed, and which one works strong or weak. Salt management is one of the crucial points in their craftsmanship.

Miso’s Health Benefits

Raw soybean is already rich in nutrients, even without fermentation. The fermentation will make it more nutritious, adding various amino acids and vitamins, and make them easier for digestion.

We, Juveriente®, focus on the improved isoflavone of fermented soybean and introduce it by EFFISOY®, our natural menopause supplement.

Soy sauce’s production method

They make koji by soy and wheat together and then add saltwater to make something called “moromi.”  They ferment moromi into Soy Sauce.

The salt will prevent unwanted microorganisms’ contamination while it makes the base taste of soy sauce as a seasoning. It will also work to keep the activity of the yeast and lactobacillus slow for the better taste. Salt management is delicate and essential here, too.

Soy sauce’s health benefits

Soy sauce is also rich in various nutrients like miso, by its complicated fermentation of soy and wheat. But, it is just seasoning and very salty. You can’t take much, and the practical health benefit will be limited.

But it adds an excellent taste to foods and entices your appetite.

Natto’s production method

Natto and rice
Rice with natto is one of the popular dishes in Japan.

Natto’s production method is much simpler than other fermented soybeans above. They soak soy in water and boil it to make it soft. Then they add natto bacteria and keep it warm for fermentation.

While the fermentation duration of miso and soy sauce varies from 6 months to 2 years, it is only about one day for natto, and only by a single microorganism, natto bacteria.

They manage the contamination of unwanted microorganisms and the fermentation speed by the delicate salt concentration control for miso and soy sauce. Still, they kill unwanted organisms only by boiling for natto.

Natto’s health benefits

While Natto’s production method is much simpler than its siblings, it has plentiful health benefits.

Nattokinase is already famous in the dietary supplements market. It is known to have an anti-thrombosis effect.

It’s rich in Vitamin K2, and it helps bone health.

Natto bacteria will activate and support the multiplication of lactobacillus in a gut. Besides, natto bacteria is thermal durable and can reach the intestine alive.

The primary material of the stickiness, polyglutamic acid, will restrain the surge of blood glucose levels after meals.

Natto’s isoflavone

The fermentation removes the sugar from soy. It makes the isoflavone absorbable by anybody, as mentioned above. Is it the same in natto? Unfortunately, the answer is “NO.” According to Nichimo Biotics, the manufacturer of AglyMax®, a fermented soybean germ and Effisoy®’s main key functional ingredient, the fermentation of natto is too short and doesn’t remove the sugar.

How to take the benefits of the Japanese fermented soybean foods

As we have already discussed, fermented foods have their unique flavors, and they may be odd to people from other dietary cultures. Even if you overcome it by tireless (?) effort, it won’t be easy to find high-quality products in your country, where those foods are not common. Do you even get it over by your homemade?

It will be possible, but the standard solution will be dietary supplements.

Here are some recommendations for you.

A casual natto experience with reasonable price


Multiple enzymes complex including nattokinase


The only supplement you can take isoflavones from fermented soy



Buy Effisoy from Juveriente Online ShopAttention: Effisoy® is only US$35/unit in the Juveriente® shop. (for multiple units per shipping in the USA, except for Hawaii and Alaska)

Learn more about Effisoy®.

LEARN MORE

 

 Breast Cancer Rates and Fermented Soy Foods

Breast cancer rates are far different between USA and Japan.

Breast cancer rates are far different between the USA and Japan, according to a report by researchers from the National Cancer Center of Japan.

 

Breast Cancer Incidence Rate Comparison US/Japan
This image was copied from JMAJ 52(1): 39–44, 2009 by Kumiko SAIKA and Tomotaka SOBUE.

Breast Cancer Mortality Rate US Japan
This image was copied from JMAJ 52(1): 39–44, 2009 by Kumiko SAIKA and Tomotaka SOBUE.

What makes such vast differences? Can western women take the same effect with Japanese women through something?

Attention: We are curating information from various credible websites here. But we are never in a position to determine anything medical about them. Please consult with a doctor when you utilize any info on this page for your actual health. 

Breast Cancer Rates and Soy Foods / Researches by Harvard Univ. and Oregon State University

Soy FoodsWhile there may be a complex of reasons for the above, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health introduces a study, which suggested a lower risk of breast cancer and lower risk of breast cancer recurrence by taking more soy foods, in their web page, “Straight Talk About Soy.”

Oregon state university also introduces the same study.  (Refer these web pages for further details.)

Both web pages also introduce a mixed extent of benefits depending on individuals and Asian women vs. Western women. There are some analysis and guess of the reason. The hint maybe in the studies of the National Cancer Center of Japan, the country of soy diet.

Reverse correlation of breast cancer rates and fermented soy foods diet

Miso Soup Research - JuverienteA group of researchers from the National Cancer Center of Japan, too,  conducted a large cohort study by following 20,000 women, aged 44-59, for ten years. The study aimed to find a correlation between the consumption of soy-based foods and the risk of breast cancer. They found a less reverse correlation in the diet of non-fermented soy foods, but the significant reverse correlation in the diet of fermented soy food, miso soup.

(The report summary in Japanese is here, and the English translation by Google Translate is here. )

While they don’t pursue any conclusions about the difference between the fermented soy and non-fermented soy, one intriguing matter is that they mention the “protection effect by isoflavone” as common sense. Isoflavone  is a phytoestrogen but has almost 1/1,000 – 1/10,000 power of estrogen. When such a mild phytoestrogen sticks to estrogen receptors, it will protect them from too much stimulation by estrogen. This notion already prevalent in Japan, even among ordinary people.

Fermented vs non-fermented soy

Juveriente®’s natural menopause supplement, Effisoy®, is featured with fermented soybean germ extract, named AglyMax®. The supplier of AglyMax, Nichimo Biotic, did various clinical researches about their fermented soy extract. They are regarding menopausal relief and never intended to link it to breast cancer matters. Still they give us some hints and suggestions about the discussions above, why some women receive benefits of soy against breast cancer, and why fermented soy diet has far more significant reverse correlation with breast cancer onset ratio. (Some of their knowledge is summarized here.)

Traditional healthy food for Japanese, soy

Medical matters are too complicated to make any conclusions from limited information. One thing sure is that soy foods, both fermented and non-fermented, have always been staples in Japan and have provided health benefits to Japanese people over hundreds of years.

Back to Home

LEARN MORE

 

The Evolution Of Japanese Cuisine

The food history of humans is one of the lenses through which to view the evolution of culture, creativity, and health. Food history is typically broken down into three patterns: famine, sufficiency, and abundance. In modern times, most of us live in a world of abundance, if not over-abundance. Lifestyle-related diseases, like Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease, have developed in many countries due to changes in how we live, how active we are, and what we eat. When it comes to the things we put in our body, natural supplements like Effisoy are part of this philosophy: our bodies respond to what we ingest. This philosophy has been an integral part of Japanese culture for millenia.

Diet concerns the global population of humans. The need for a healthy diet is not restricted to certain countries or populations, although some countries have shown better results regarding general population health. Japan is one such country. The attention and care given to diet, the food produced, consumed, and presented, far exceeds many other countries, especially those in the Western hemisphere. But Japanese traditions did not spring forth from nothing. Much of the initial influence on Japanese practices was Chinese.

Ancient Chinese medicine, herbal medicine, folk medicine, and the use of specific animal parts is still found in modern day practices in China, Japan, and other Eastern countries. The connectivity is key: healthy ingredients aren’t just given to those who are sick. They are woven into the fabric of daily life. This practice can be traced through the evolution of Japan’s culinary culture, a chronology that begins in the 5th century.

A physician who came to Japan from China in the 5th century, through the Korean peninsula, was one of the first to share the knowledge between countries. By the 7th century, the Imperial Court of Japan had sent missions to Sui and Tang China so that emissaries could learn about medicine as well as state administration. This led to a code that was an imitation of Tang China’s legal code, and within the law was a stipulation that Japanese medicine should be based on Chinese medicine. But other factors were at play, including environmental, social and political forces.

japanese food facts

Japanese food Facts

Environmentally, Japan has always been a culture focused around rice, as has China. A Chinese text from 5 AD said, “Grains are the basis that sustain life. Fruits support the power of grains, meats provide benefit, and vegetables enrich.” While other regions were wheat-based (often colder areas), Japan and China were warm and humid, the perfect region for rice. With rice cultivation comes water and fish, so rice and fish became staples for the people in this region. Japan also has mountains that cover over 70 percent of its land area, as well as extensive rivers; this landscape has had its effect on food as well as the plants grown. There are many plants that grow in Japan that have been used for medicinal purposes. For example, some studies have shown there were more than 800 species of plants used to make folk medicines. This is out of a tallied 7,000 species of plants that grow in Japan, meaning nearly 10% of all plants in Japan are medicinal. This statistic is incredible to imagine.

The use of these medicinal plants is key to understanding the evolution of Japanese cuisine. According to Chinese practice, plants, herbs and spices are broken down into five tastes which function according to season, physical condition, illness, and the need to avoid some foods and some food combinations. Understanding these tastes also prioritized the importance of mind-body connection, and the evolution of this philosophy can be traced through various periods.

In the Heian period, (794-1185), the daikyō ryōri, the cuisine at the time, was very similar to Chinese food in terms of what was eaten as well as how. For example, a menu had to have an even number of dishes, and both spoons and chopsticks used. During this period, Japanese also developed “cutting” skills, deeming some to be “masters of the knives.” This is when the attention to detail first came into play regarding the skills necessary to be a master chef.

  Japanese Cuisine History

Japanese Cuisine

The shōjin ryōri (精進料理) of the Kamakura period (1185-1333) also mirrored the Chinese traditions, but in a different way. During this time, monks had who had studied at Chinese zen temples came to Japan and emphasized that there should be no consumption of animal products. Pork had become popular five hundred years before, had waned with government intervention, but was still eaten at times. These monks did, however, use fine ingredients–herbs and spices–to create elaborate dishes without meat, dishes that mimicked the flavor. The flavors of Japanese cuisine grew to include “yōkan (jelly made from bean paste) and ganmodoki (tofu fritter) dishes. Other plates used agar instead of gelatin, or tofu made from high-protein soybeans. Much of the food was fried or prepared in sesame oil or miso. During this era, Buddhism was integrated into the cuisine. The typical Japanese soup stock was also developed during this time. The soup stock that was used was probably extracted from ingredients such as kombu seaweed and shiitake mushrooms; this was the progenitor of the distinctive dashi stock that is currently a defining component of Japanese cuisine.

The Muromachi period (1337-1573) brought in honzen ryōri (本膳料理), cuisine that was served at celebrations for samurai. This is when Japanese cuisine began to depart from Chinese influence. One way was that the meal had to have an odd number of elements. It was also eaten from small individual trays (zen) and suited to a floor-based lifestyle. Only chopsticks were utilized, rather than chopsticks and spoons. This is also the period of the tea ceremony, flower ceremony, and the first culinary schools. The soup that had been developed in the previous era was also developed more through the use of katsuobuhi (dried bonito shavings). This final ingredient solidified the stock that is fundamental to modern Japanese dashi-based food culture.

The Sengoku period (c. 1467 – c. 1603) brought a highly spiritual form of cuisine that developed at the same time as the tea etiquette and ceremonies. There was more attention brought to detail. The method of serving and preparing was emphasized, and every tea ceremony was seen as a unique encounter between individuals. Importance was given to all aspects of cuisine.

The Edo period (1603-1868), brought about the popularization of cuisine. Restaurants were developed, and the consumer culture of cuisine grew. Anyone could enjoy gourmet food, whenever they liked, as long as they had the money to pay for it. This creative period brought about kaiseki ryōri (会席料理), a cuisine consisting of a number of dishes served on a tray that was ordered in advance and eaten at restaurants. Still focusing on classic ingredients–rice, fish, vegetables–the elaboration of dishes evolved. Cuisine schools and cookbooks grew in popularity and industries to produce soy sauce and miso thrived. This era also brought about more knowledge regarding health and diet. Whenever there were outbreaks of diseases, like smallpox or cholera, there were woodblock prints that explained which foods to avoid and which to consume.

japanese food culture history

Japanese food

The evolution of medicine deepened during this time. In 1709, a culmination of herbal knowledge was published in the book Yamato honzō. This text was the last in a series explaining and defining Japanese herbalism. By the mid-1700s, the notion that food, sex, and sleep were intimately connected to health was held to be the norm. And yet, 100 years later by 1869, during the era of Westernization, Western medicine was adopted as the predominant medicine of Japan. This coincided with the height of the Edo period. As Western practices were adopted, the divide grew between those who had wealth and those who didn’t. This created an imbalance, a sense of culinary hedonism. In the cities, abundance became the norm, whereas in the countryside, families were starving from famine and disease.

But the growth continued, regardless, and utilization the plants and produce available continued to improve the reputation of Japanese cuisine. The dishes evolved to include more herbs, spices, and experimentation, but the culture remained tied to rice, miso, fish, and the dashi stock. It was only in the 1980s that consumption of meat passed consumption of fish. The ideal meal of Japanese cuisine emphasizes one soup and three side dishes. Throughout the 20th century, this combination of plates has felt the outside influence. Japan’s food self-sufficiency decreased below 40% by the end of the 20th century. And yet, even with the integration of products from other countries, the health of the Japanese people has been sustained. Part of that is due to the education of the young.

In politics and education, Japan has adapted a unique system known as FOSHU (Food for Specified Health Use) that emphasizes how healthy foods sustain humans, but diet cannot be a singular solution. Diet and health accumulate over years. With the philosophy of Ishoku-Dogen, popularized in the 1970s, there has been a return to seeing food and health as interwoven, but that integration comes through authentic creations. Japanese people won’t just add an herb or take a pill for the health benefit; they incorporate the flavor into their daily habits. The evolution of the Japanese emphasis on diet, on the meticulous attention paid to the details of cuisine, has powerful effects. The Japanese are known to be some of the healthiest people in the world. In fact, the World Health Organization stated that the Japanese have the longest life expectancy of any country in the world, with an average of 83.7 years. [1]This culture of cuisine will only continue to evolve and develop with time, and there are many lessons that can be learned if the ultimate goal is health and longevity of a good life. [1]

Menopause is a natural and biological process, but it’s symptoms can disturb your lifestyle.These symptoms can be cause of low energy, disturbing sleep and your emotional health! If you’re experiencing these symptoms and looking natural relief for menopause, then check out our amazon online shop.

How to Strengthen the Body for Aging: Focus on Natural Menopause Supplements

Pursuit of menopause solution

As one ages gracefully, there is a tendency to overwhelm someone with rapid-fire “solutions” as the body changes. Healthy aging is all about paying attention. For example, when menopause symptoms began for me, I didn’t know where to begin. My hormones were going crazy. Should I consider HRT (hormone replacement therapy?) How could I help my body shift through the hormonal fluctuations? I desperately looked for solutions from HRT to natural menopause supplements.

I found Effisoy, a natural way to assist my body as my estrogen levels shifted. For me, that discovery was an answer I needed, and I needed to find it on my own. It takes time to find what works for each person but paying attention to what feels like it needs care is an important place to start.

Various helps by natural products

All-natural products like Effisoy and other natural menopause supplements can ease the hormonal changes that begin around perimenopause and yet, hormonal changes are just one part of the landscape of aging.

To help strengthen bones, herbs like stinging nettle, slippery elm, oat and horsetail have been connected to bone mineralization. Circulation could be improved through turmeric, ginger, cayenne and black pepper. Natural remedies for inflammation can include turmeric, green tea, and white willow bark.

How to find your best option

In this internet age, all it takes is a little research. Research and time. Taking time to test what is right for your body is also important before you dive into the world of natural menopause supplements. Read the reviews on Amazon. Ask questions. Test out supplements in small doses to see how they work with your body. Trust the process of learning what works best for you. This time of aging is fruitful, a perfect opportunity to learn about what your body needs and how to move forward.

LEARN MORE
LEARN MORE BSC

Natural Immune Booster, Effisoy®

Are you looking for a strong immune booster supplement?

We are all under the severe threat of COVID-19, but, as everybody knows, there is no vaccine yet, unfortunately. You may be looking for some medicines or supplements to make you immune immediately. But, no one resolution has a drastic effect. But we have to protect ourselves through various basic and natural hygiene and health practices.

The first and most important things are that you wash your hands and throat frequently. The number of people affected by the flu is lower by 60% compared to last year in Japan. It will be attributed to the improvement of such basic hygiene practices. So they will also be protective against other viruses, including COVID-19.

Another important thing is to keep up your immunity sound. There are many factors to affect your immune system.

Believe or not, (or maybe already well known?) smiling is one of the most definite immune boosters. You can read many studies nowadays. (For example, here is one by Mayo clinic.) In addition to smiling, there are also some basic practices. Having some exercises, taking various foods, sleeping well, and managing your stress. (Read this Huff Post article for such solutions.)

The other popular answer is that you take fermented foods. Over 60% of your immune cells and antibody protein against aggressors exist in your gut. Fermented foods will keep up the better balance of your enteric bacteria and support such immune cells and antibodies.

Yogurt will be the most familiar fermented food for you. But other fermented foods, Miso (fermented soy), Natto (fermented soy), Kimchi, etc., may be hard for you to eat.

Effisoy will be an easy and natural alternation to such Asian fermented foods. Its key ingredient is the extract of fermented soybean germ. Effisoy works as a natural immune booster through multiple courses not limited in the sense that it is made of Japanese fermented food.

First of all, we need to explain to you its effect as made of the fermented soybean germ, AglyMax. Fermented soy is off course, known to support the immune system. 

This natural ingredient has another excellent feature, high antioxidant capacity. It is higher than some great antioxidant ingredients, Gingko Biloba and Pine Bark extract, as shown in the table.

An excellent antioxidant also supports your immunity.

There is one more course. If your sleep is improved and your mood swing is stabilized, it will also prop up your immune system. Effisoy will help you as an immune booster through such multiple courses.

menopause natural relief and anti aging product

Why is Aging a Beautiful Process?

Aging is a beautiful, yes, beautiful, process. It is a shift in the body, mind and emotions that cannot be known by someone until they are experiencing it themselves. Someone once told me that I would never be able to know 40-year-old knee pains until I was a 40-year-old with knee pains. Any other age presents the same type of learning. Though each person’s experience is their own, there are realizations that can only be experienced by a person individually at their own time. No one could have told me what my menopause symptoms would have been like, for example. The signs of menopause, the night sweats, the hot flashes, the perimenopause symptoms: all of these were for me to discover in my own body as I moved through them. That process of discovery is not terrifying but, for me, liberating.

What delights me about aging is that it invites us to consider where we are and how we can continue to live our healthiest, best life. Suddenly, some of the things that mattered to me before—pleasing others, saying yes when I didn’t want to, keeping up with social obligations—slip to the wayside. There isn’t as much time to do things I don’t want, and I feel like I’m finally learning how to identify what I want. If I can claim aging as a sign of power, if I claim it as owning and celebrating my body in a new and different way, the stigma begins to disappear, and an emergence of strength tumbles forth. That strength may not always manifest in my knees or my back, and it may take me more time to get around than I used to, and yet, there is so much to celebrate as humans age. Perhaps in the moving more slowly, I am better able to see what’s happening around me. Aging encourages me to be present, both to my body and to what happens outside of me. That balance is the beauty of this process, a gift to see everything, including myself, with a different lens. 

What is aging?

Throughout my life, I knew this moment was coming. Aging, the “slow decline,” as some folks would say. “Just wait until you experience it,” they’d tell me. Now, moving into my fifties, I have to admit that I could never have anticipated how much I would enjoy this process based on the messages I grew up hearing. Rather than being something to fear, aging is a reason for celebration. Becoming older is becoming more beautiful. We live in an era where our age, rather than limiting us, is starting to open up possibilities, and taking control of our lives, especially as women, is a vital part of that process. We are beautiful older women. The time has come to move beyond anti-wrinkle cream and anti-aging products to embrace what is the new norm. It is not wrong; it is simply, powerfully, different.

Technically speaking, aging is when the cells in our bodies don’t quite replicate or take care of us and our systems in the way they used to when we were younger. However, aging doesn’t just happen with a sudden snap of the fingers around the age of 40. Your lungs begin to age as soon as your early 20s. Our whole life, we are dying. Think about that. And yet, aging is a lot more about changing than it is about dying. That may seem radical to say, but as I’ve gotten more used to the shifts in my body, mind, and heart, I see how these changes do not necessarily have to be good or bad. Rather, they exist beyond this good-bad binary and they defy my expectations. To age gracefully is to sink into acceptance and to open up to curiosity in a way that is radical, revolutionary, and powerful. 

Serving Up Love with Ginger Lemon Tea

When talking with Ayurvedic doctors in New Delhi, India, there are many daily practices that are encouraged based on each individual’s particular body make-up. Ayurveda, one of the oldest medicinal systems, is based on the notion of doshas, that each person has a certain combination of elements that influence the body: the types of food to be eaten, the best times of day for work or for rest, the forms of exercise that benefit the body most. For those who have often struggled with digestive problems, be it a slow constitution or frequent stomach cramping and aches, one remedy prescribed is a morning brew of ginger and lemon tea.

The word tea doesn’t really even apply to this simple tincture, a combination of boiled water, lemon, and sliced and peeled ginger. It is a daily tonic that not only warms the intestinal system, but also can spark digestion for the day ahead. As women age, the body too find new methods of processing, of slowing down. A slow digestive system is one of the problems many women report. A survey in 2013 showed that almost 75% of Americans struggle with digestive problems symptoms. The factors are multifold, and require a longer commitment to a healthier lifestyle, including elements of exercise, cooking, intentional grocery shopping, and other environmental and mental factors. But one solution to jumpstarting a slow digestive system is a simple brew of ginger and lemon tea.

natural anti aging secrets - ginger lemon tea benefits

Ginger Lemon Tea benefits – Juveriente ®

Preparing Lemon Ginger Tea

Boil 2-4 cups of water.

Peel a portion of the ginger root about the size of half a finger’s length.

Slice the ginger into small pieces.

When the water is boiling, add the ginger and steep for 5-10 minutes in a covered pot.

Drain the ginger water into a mug and squeeze half a lemon into the mug.

Stir and drink, slowly, with intention.

You will see that in a week you already getting positive lemon ginger tea benefits.

The Benefits of Ginger and Lemon

 Benefits of Ginger and Lemon

Ginger, a rhizome of the zingiber family, is packed with antioxidants that combat the attack of free radicals on the body, uncharged molecules that can cause oxidative stress and undermine the body’s strength. Ginger is also anti-inflammatory, antifungal, anti-parasitic, and antimicrobial.Think of it as a broom sweeping through and scrubbing at the intestinal lining, searching for and eliminating signs of oxidative stress and bacterial build-up. When the ginger can help the body better absorb nutrients, the fresh lemon juice targets indigestion and heartburn. Both lemon and ginger also contain large quantities of vitamins A and C, which can help improve hair quality as well as dry skin. Most impressively, however, is that this concoction, while helpful for digestion, also targets cognitive function.

Good for the Body and Mind

Lemon, being high in potassium, stimulates the nervous system in the brain, providing an extra jolt of mental energy. Ginger, simultaneously, improves blood function, increasing the body’s circulation and carrying important vitamins, minerals and nutrients to the body’s cells.

The Power of New Habits

A simple glass of this warming liquid in the morning can help jump start the day in a way that is both energizing and calming. The stomach is activated, ready to consume the healthy foods that will follow, and the mind is alert, prepared to tackle the tasks of the day. Also, the simple practice of morning ritual is known to have a calming effect on times of transition, which is the best way to describe the cycle of menopause. New habits are a science, a practice of identifying what the body needs and giving it an accompanying reward. They can be created at any age, and any new habit that serves the body’s greater good can be implemented during the menopausal cycle. It is a time when the body asks for more love, more kindness, and more nurturing, and that can be given even in a simple glass of morning tea.

menopause relief and anti aging - Effisoy

MenoPAUSE

Frantic schedules. Daily exhaustion. Commitment and caring for family, friends, coworkers, students, patients, community members. As women age and enter the cycles of perimenopause and menopause, it is not likely that the daily stresses of life will decrease. In fact, as many women are moving into their late 40s, 50s and 60s, the pressures often only increase, be those social, health-related, or financial. Many studies in the last decade have shown how increased levels of stress affect the health of the body. 

Stress Effects

When the immune system is constantly over-activated, in that perpetually heightened state of flight or fight, it may lead to autoimmune disease. An elevated state of stress correlates with inflamed cytokines. Cytokines are chemicals released by the immune system that give orders to armies of cells to attack viruses, pathogenic bacteria, and cancer cells. But when the body is continually giving orders to attack because it’s reacting to stress levels, that heightened state can have many negative outcomes.

Combatting Emotional Highs and Lows

When it comes to protecting the body against one of its own worst enemies- itself—lifestyle changes are important. Studies have shown that women in the menopausal transition can have an increased risk of major depressive disorder (MDD). Estrogen therapies, like all-natural Effisoy, antidepressant medications, and other remedies can assist the body in regulation. There are also daily practices that can be utilized to maintain balance in the body and to avoid some of those heightened cycles of stress.

Intentional Breathing
intentional breathing exercise for menopause

Nowadays, most folks know that meditation and deep breathing are beneficial not only for the mind but also for the body. A study from Johns Hopkins University found that in 47 trials, mindful meditation helped ease psychological stresses, including pain, anxiety, and depression. The role of breathing is crucial in meditation. There are many types of meditations, from guided to individual sessions. And yet, many still wonder whether focusing on breathing is actually sufficient to alter moods. Does how we breathe really affect change and reduce stress levels? 

It’s All in the Breath

Studies show that most people don’t breathe in a way that gives the body enough oxygen. When breathing shallowly, that stagnant air, its residue and pollutants can get caught in the lungs, sometimes leading to more labored breathing as well as toxic buildup. In comparison, deep breathing moves oxygen through the blood and cells. Breathing is, of course, a natural process, but by adding an extra dose of intentionality, you can make your breathing that much more powerful, potent, and healthy. 

Breathing Exercise

This exercise can help release some of the tension in a heated moment. Exhaling, that deep sigh or breath, comes naturally as the body needs to release stress. That deep, intentional exhale triggers a relaxation response in the brain. This exercise can be done anywhere, in just a few minutes, and can help calm the mind and relax that overactive autoimmune response. 

  1. Take a comfortable seat, wherever you are, in your car or on a chair or the ground. 
  2. Close your eyes, embodying alertness yet comfort.
  3. Slowly elongate your breath—deeply breathe in, and deeply let it seep out.
  4. As your breathing slows, extend the exhale to twice the time of your inhale. If you breathe in for 3 seconds, try to breathe out for 6 seconds.
  5. Create a pattern of this imbalanced breathing, focusing more on the breath out. Do this for 5 minutes, or for as long as you can. 
  6. Before finishing this exercise, pause. Take a few more intentional deep breaths before opening your eyes, and then come back into the present. 

Do you like the article? Share your knowledge with others.